Artistic research – what is it, how it is done and by whom? These are some of the questions I hope I will able answer in this series that I start here.

My focus is oral storytelling in combination with artistic research.

There is an increased focus on artistic research. For example, in a meeting with Prio – Center for Peace Research, this has become a topical issue. Firstly, the art is in focus because it is something that suffers when “it goes down with a society”. The art is, after all, the flower of freedom of speech.

Secondly, artistic research contributes

with other methods when it comes to accessing people’s data, and it also has another language that may describe reality more diverse, like it is.
There are several reasons for why artistic research is relevant and promoted as a form of knowledge. For example, there has arisen a need for artistic concepts to be theory-driven in interaction with the practical (Mäkelä, Nimkulrat, Dash, & Nsenga, 2011). This in turn is due to an expectation that art should mean something more to society than “just being art”. And artists are employed at universities and colleges, and it is natural that they bring their aesthetic experience into academia.

What is meaning making? This is where artistic research comes in, because it helps to make meaning (Roes & Pint), though, perhaps in a different way, the use of other methods, such as embodied knowledge.

However, it does not mean that knowledge is embedded in the work itself, having an aesthetical experience of hearing a story is not enough. The artistic researcher must also reflect on the knowledge and disseminate this beyond the work of art itself (Roes & Pint).

What is artistic research? Here there are as many answers as there are artists employed at universities. Therefore, it can be difficult to understand what it means to be an artistic researcher.

What is artistic research? Here there are as many answers as there are artists employed at universities. Therefore, it can be difficult to understand what it means to be an artistic researcher. However, there are some similarities through the literature :

Firstly, artistic research is sidelined with other research work. This is enshrined in “Act relating to universities and university colleges” in Norway.

The second feature is that the artwork must be followed by a textual reflection containing a research question, a defined methodology, contextualization and references (Mkel, Nimkulrat, Dash, Nsenga, 2011).

But one needs to be aware that the artistic researcher at universities must struggle to gain an understanding of the results that artistic research is giving (Mkel, Nimkulrat, Dash, Nsenga, 2011).

There is no uniform discourse within artistic research and what lies in the term has different interpretations, even within a single institution it can be understood differently (Mkel, Nimkulrat, Dash, Nsenga, 2011). This also leads to different requirements for artistic research, but both form and content should be contextualized and communicated, and both practice and theory must be the base of artistic research.

To sum it up:
The general theory of artistic research states that artistic research should have both an artistic process and an artistic work, and there should be a reflection present that points beyond the work itself.

Kilder:
Duby, M., & Barker, P. A. (n.d.). Deterritorialising the Research Space: Artistic Research Embodied Knowledge, and the Academy.
Mäkelä, M., Nimkulrat, N., Dash, D., & Nsenga, F.-X. (2011). On Reflecting and Making in Artistic Research. Journal of Research Practice Vol. 7, Issue 1.

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